Nel's New Day

April 19, 2019

Barr Obstructs Justice

Back in 1978, a Democratic-controlled Congress passed the Ethics in Government Act allowing attorneys general to “request that a specially appointed three-judge panel appoint an outside individual to investigate and prosecute alleged violations of criminal law.” Fast-forward 22 years and a GOP-controlled Congress let the law lapse. The DOJ, however, knew that the administrations would continue to have scandals that needed an independent investigator to objectively gather and analyze evidence and testimony, and present conclusions to the public. Before George W. Bush took office, DOJ officials created guidelines for “specific investigations or prosecutions that may be deemed to present a conflict of interest if pursued under the normal procedures of the agency.” After Dictator Donald Trump (DDT) appointed Jeff Sessions as his new AG, deputy AG Rod Rosenstein, in charge of the DOJ investigation because of Sessions’ conflicts of interest with Russian contacts, appointed Robert Mueller under the 2000 DOJ special counsel guidelines.

To avoid giving special investigators too much power with little oversight, the AG—or in this case deputy AG Rod Rosenstein—could manage investigations. Guidelines required Mueller to “receive, review, and, where appropriate, forward to the Attorney General or an agency head … disclosures of violations of any law, rule, or regulation, or gross mismanagement, a gross waste of funds, an abuse of authority, or a substantial and specific danger to public health or safety.” Rosenstein also required Mueller to give the person in charge a confidential final report about why the investigator prosecuted some people but not others. That requirement came from Ken Starr’s “grandiose vision of the truth-reporting role,” as legal experts Jack Goldsmith and Maddie McMahon wrote in a Lawfare blog essay. Rosenstein worked for Starr during the Whitewater investigation.

Mueller indicted 34 people and obtained guilty pleas, trial successes, and sentencing in 22 months. A few weeks after Bill Barr, the man who wrote a memo explaining his viewpoints that the president is above the law, was confirmed as AG. Weeks later, Mueller’s investigation was shut down. Barr took Mueller’s 448-page report, changed the opinion to exonerate DDT, heavily redacted the report, refused to give the unredacted document to Congress, and went back to exonerating DDT through omissions, misrepresentations, and lies:

  • Barr justified DDT’s obstruction of justice by saying that he was “frustrated and angered.”
  • Barr said nothing about DDT’s expectation of benefiting from hacked material.
  • Barr claimed that he should made the decision on obstruction of justice although the report had a conclusion:  “[I]f we had confidence after a thorough investigation of the facts that the President clearly did not commit obstruction of justice, we would so state.”
  • Barr too responsibility for decision-making from Congress despite Mueller’s order “that Congress can validly regulate the President’s exercise of official duties to prohibit actions motivated by a corrupt intent to obstruct justice.” Barr refuses to give Congress the unredacted report.
  • Barr claimed no “obstructive conduct” because DDT’s staff wouldn’t follow his orders to obstruct justice. In DDT and Barr’s world, failure after attempting a crime means no crime. Mueller states that DDT tried many times and with many aides to impair, limit, and shut down Mueller’s investigation and wrote that DDT’s attempts “were often carried out through one-on-one meetings in which the President sought to use his official power outside of usual channels.”
  • Barr repeatedly used the term “no collusion”—one of DDT’s favorite terms—although Mueller clarified that collusion is not a legal term. The report has over 100 pages of connections that describe “collusion.” Mueller’s summary states that DDT’s “Campaign expected it would benefit electorally from information stolen and released through Russian efforts.”
  • Barr claimed that DDT fully cooperated with the investigation. Yet DDT repeatedly refused requests to be interviewed for the investigation and showed an abysmal lack of recall in 19 of 22 responses to written questions.
  • Barr insisted that Mueller “found no evidence” of DDT’s campaign conspired with Russia to interfere in the 2016 presidential election, but Mueller identified “numerous” Trump campaign-Russia contacts. It outlines how Trump was elected with Russia’s help.

Eleven instances of DDT’s obstruction of justice could be prosecuted as crimes, according to Mueller:

  • DDT’s efforts to fire Mueller.
  • DDT’s order to former FBI director James Comey to drop the investigation into Michael Flynn.
  • DDT’s firing of Comey.
  • DDT’s efforts to hijack oversight of the Mueller investigation.
  • DDT’s order to White House counsel, Donald McGahn, to deny that Trump had tried to fire Mueller.
  • DDT’s conduct with associates who pled guilty to crimes, including Flynn, Paul Manafort and Michael Cohen.
  • DDT’s “repeated efforts to get McGahn to create a record denying that the President had directed him to remove the special counsel.” are held up for special scrutiny.
  • DDT’s publicly telling witnesses not to cooperate.
  • DDT’s telling Michael Cohen to not contradict him in congressional testimony about Trump Tower Moscow.
  • DDT’s trying to hide emails exposing Donald Trump Jr.’s meeting with Russians for “dirt” on Hillary Clinton.
  • DDT’s advanced knowledge about the planned dumps of Democratic emails hacked by Russia and given to WikiLeaks.
  • Dozens of accounts of suspect contacts between Russian operatives and Trump campaign figures.

The report states: “If we had confidence after a thorough investigation of the facts that the President clearly did not commit obstruction of justice, we would so state.However, we are unable to reach that judgment.

Barr’s exoneration of DDT might become the “Trump defense” for people charged with crimes: he isn’t guilty because he was angry and failed.

Other revelations in the unredacted portions of Mueller’s report:

Witnesses and investigated individuals often used message aps to automatically delete emails and texts after they are read or within a short time. Other documents were hard to find because witnesses and subjects lived out of the United States. The erasure of messages may have violated federal law. Mueller wrote that his office “cannot rule out the possibility that the unavailable information would shed additional light on (or cast in a new light) the events described in the report.”

DDT forced former AG Jeff Sessions to give him a letter of resignation and then kept it in his suit jacket’s inner pocket, pulling it out during meetings with aides. Reince Priebus said he worried that DDT was using the letter to influence DOJ investigations.

DDT told 33-year-old Stephen Miller, who has no legal training, to make the legal determination on whether he could fire Comey without cause. The White House lawyer, Don McGahn, “in an effort to slow down the decision-making process,” insisted top DOJ leaders be consulted.

After receiving the Mueller report, DOJ gave its information to the White House to help DDT’s legal team prepare a rebuttal and public relations strategy.

Many passages about DDT’s discussions between DDT’s campaign and WikiLeaks in releasing emails to damage Clinton have been blocked out, but enough remains to indicate a connection between DDT’s campaign and Russia. Mueller confirmed that the Russians tried to hack the Illinois Board of Elections website in 2016, penetrated computer systems in at least one Florida county government, and planted malware in systems at a manufacturer of election equipment. In 2016, Russian agents also hacked into the DCCC computers and disseminated the stolen information reporters and other individuals for six states.

The Rantt Rundown, “Day 819 of Trump’s “Presidency,” gives a detailed analysis of the Mueller report, “Report On The Investigation Into Russian Interference In The 2016 Presidential Election.” It also points out that the report is damning for Barr’s reputation because of the contradictions, especially because of his conclusion that his memo arguing a sitting president cannot be indicted had no influence on Mueller’s decision-making. Mueller said Barr’s position was a factor. The full report and analysis are here. The U.S. attorney general is the chief law enforcement body for the people of the United States, not an extension of Trump’s personal legal team.

Sen. Richard Burr (R-NC), chair of Select Committee on Intelligence, gave the White House information about the Russia investigation after he had a private briefing with then-FBI Director James Comey. Soon afterward, DDT panicked. Although perhaps not as nefarious as DDT’s lapdog Rep. Devin Nunes (R-CA), once chair of the Intelligence committee, Burr has said he’s inclined to ignore the Russia scandal, downplayed it, and then said that he saw nothing wrong in DDT’s privately demanding personal loyalty from Comey.

House Judiciary Chair Jerrold Nadler (D-NY) issued a subpoena for Robert Mueller’s full report. Barr has stated that the DOJ will not allow him to release the unredacted portion to the public—or even Congress. History proves him wrong.

Mueller’s wrote:

“If we had confidence after a thorough investigation of the facts that the president clearly did not commit obstruction of justice, we would so state. Based on the facts and the applicable legal standards, however, we are unable to reach that judgment.”

Jon Swaine wrote in The Guardian: 

“No past president has so frequently denied reality, nor seemed so unfamiliar with the very concept of shame. Neither, perhaps, has any past president enjoyed the support of such a compliant Senate, which is Republican-held, and willing to excuse his every scandal in the service of their agenda.

Mueller’s work lives on in Roger Stone’s trial, planned House hearings, and continued investigation of DDT’s business and inaugural committee by Manhattan federal prosecutors. DDT know that he’s in trouble: he now rants about the “Crazy Mueller Report” during his religious commemoration of Good Friday when he played a round of golf.

Republicans for the Rule of Law, a conservative group with the mission of “defending the institutions of our republic,” will attempt to run a TV ad on Fox network urging GOP lawmakers to hold DDT accountable for Mueller’s findings. The 34-second ad opens, “Twenty years ago, Republicans denounced a Democratic president for lying and obstructing justice.” It concludes, “Republicans stood for the rule of law then. We should stand for the rule of law now.” Longwell, added that the group wants Republicans to “act like a congressional body with equal powers and to provide a check on a president, who clearly from this report does not respect the rule of law.”

 

 

 

End Barr:

August 24, 2018

DDT: Week 83 – Treading Water

Last Tuesday was a day of eights—Michael Cohen, the fixer for Dictator Donald Trump (DDT), pleaded guilty to eight counts, and Paul Manafort, DDT’s former campaign manager, was found guilty of eight counts. Covers from two major U.S. publications show DDT’s troubles, but the next few weeks may get worse.

Cohen’s “unnamed candidate” is obviously DDT regarding payments to Stormy Daniels “in coordination and at the direction of a candidate for federal office” and Karen McDougal “under direction of the same candidate.” The fixer said that “I participated in this conduct for the principal purpose” of influencing an election. He claimed that DDT told him to pay two women in violation of campaign finance laws to keep them from going public about DDT’s affairs with them. Cohen’s investigation has been referred to New York’s Southern District; Lanny Davis, Cohen’s lawyer, tweeted:

“Today [Cohen] stood up and testified under oath that Donald Trump directed him to commit a crime by making payments to two women for the principal purpose of influencing an election.  If those payments were a crime for Michael Cohen, then why wouldn’t they be a crime for Donald Trump?”

The Trump Organization may also be in trouble after authorizing $420,000 in these payments with false invoices from Cohen concealing the purpose of the payments. An executive ordered the fees to Cohen to be described as legal expenses using the words “retainer for the month of January and February 2017.” The Manhattan D.A. is also looking into criminal charges for the Trump Organization because of Cohen’s payments and possible tax evasion by Cohen. He was also paid $50,000 for “tech services” six months after he was talking to Russians in Prague, but this may have nothing to do with any hacking. Falsifying business records becomes a felony if done to commit or conceal another crime. DDT can pardon people convicted of federal charges but not those who lose in non-federal courts. The New York State AG’s office is opening a criminal investigation into possibilities that Cohen violated state law tax.

Cohen’s plea reveals that David Pecker, head of the National Enquirer parent company American Media and DDT’s close friend, “offered to help deal with negative stories about [DDT’s] relationships with women by, among other things, assisting the [2016] campaign in identifying such stories so they could be purchased and their publication avoided.” Stories were locked in a safe. The prosecution granted Pecker immunity for testifying. The First Amendment protecting journalism probably won’t be a successful argument against the Enquirer because it failed to operate in a “legitimate press function” by promoting DDT and destroying his opponents, especially Hillary Clinton, frequently with false stories. Federal prosecutors believed the publication “acted more as a political supporter than as a news organization.”

Also granted immunity is Allen Weisselberg, Trump Organization CFO who helped reimburse the $420,000 for Michael Cohen. Weisselberg began working for DDT’s father in the 1970s and continued on with DDT, also serving as treasurer of the Donald J. Trump Foundation which is also in court for fraud. He also handled all DDT’s personal finances.

On the same day as Cohen’s pleading, a jury found Paul Manafort guilty of eight charges; one holdout juror stopped guilty rulings on the other ten despite the paper trail that the other jurors showed her. He was found guilty of five tax fraud charges, one charge of hiding foreign bank accounts, and two counts of bank fraud. Manafort’s next trial in a Washington, D.C. federal court includes more criminal charges such as failure to register his foreign lobbying and money laundering conspiracy related to the same Ukrainian political work central to the concluded case. At 69, he faces up to 80 years in prison.

After DDT denied that he considered a pardon for Manafort, Rudy Giuliani said that he talked about such a pardon with DDT after the ones for Scooter Libby and Dinesh D’Souza. Mueller is investigating these pardons as a possible obstruction of justice; pardoning Manafort could add to that evidence.

Sentencing for former national security advisor Michael Flynn has been pushed forward from August 24 to September 17.

GOP legislators are mum on the Manafort/Cohen revelations, but highly conservative Bret Stephens tweeted that DDT is guilty of “high crimes and misdemeanors.”  DDT ranted against Cohen and then claimed that his crime was no more than Barack Obama’s campaign violations—routine paperwork without intent for wrongdoing that included incorrect dates, not quickly returning donations exceeding campaign limits, and missing filing deadlines during his campaign’s final weeks. Cohen’s crimes carry a maximum prison time of 65 years.

DDT wants to make “flipping” for testimony illegal, perhaps because of the people who have flipped on him—Cohen, Michael Flynn, Rick Gates, Dylan Howard, Omarosa Manigault Newman, George Papadoulous, Pecker, and Weisselberg.

A U.S. judge dismissed a libel case from three Russian oligarchs against Christopher Steele, author of the infamous Steele dossier about the Russian scandal, about their claim that Steele and his firm had defamed them. A Steele memo reported that the oligarchs, Alfa Group businessmen, gave Vladimir Putin “informal advice” on foreign policy, especially about the U.S., and concerns the issue of Russian interference in the U.S. 2016 election. One of the oligarchs, German Khan, is the father-in-law of Alex van der Zwaan, the first person sentenced to prison in Robert Mueller’s Russian investigation.

People who claim that the Russian investigation has accomplished nothing in the past year should check the statistics: one person convicted, six people pleading guilty, 26 people charged, and 23 people interviewed (seven in White House, seven in government, three from Russia, and six others). DDT claims that it’s a “witch hunt”: his “witches” thus far convicted include his national security advisor, his personal lawyer, his campaign manager, his deputy campaign manager, and his foreign policy aide. Legal leaders of ethics groups wrote:

“The trial evidence included Mr. Manafort’s close ties to pro-Russia forces and his desperate financial straits as he ‘volunteered’ his time for the next president. The trial revealed how willing Mr. Manafort was to corruptly leverage his position of influence over Mr. Trump during the campaign for his own personal benefit. He offered briefings to a pro-Russia Ukrainian oligarch and dangled a position in the Trump administration in front of a banker who provided him a loan for which he would not otherwise have qualified….

“This is no “witch hunt.” It instead is one of the most successful special counsel investigations in history.”

The White House counsel, Don McGahn, testified to Mueller’s investigation for 30 hours, and neither DDT nor his lawyers know what McGahn said. In a rant against a New York Times story, DDT tweeted that he gave permission to McGahn to testify and “I have nothing to hide.” Yet DDT has not testified for the investigation or released his tax returns.

DDT’s lawyer Rudy Giuliani (right) melted down on Meet the Press when he repeatedly told Chuck Todd that “truth isn’t truth,” a statement that went viral. DDT and his lawyers declare that McGahn said nothing that could create problems for DDT, but speculators wonder if McGahn is protecting himself. McGahn has clearly stated that he protects the presidency, not the person in that position, although DDT looks on him as his personal lawyer. Last fall, a reporter overheard DDT layers John Dodd and Ty Cobb criticizing McGahn, information that led him to think that he would be blamed for DDT’s wrongdoing.

Giuliani may be safety ensconced on a DDT golf course in Scotland and garbed in DDT advertising, but he’s spreading the word than any move to impeach DDT would cause a revolution in the U.S. That was after DDT announced on Fox that impeachment would cause the stock market to crash and “everybody would be very poor.”

Early last week, DDT compared the investigation to McCarthyism. Roy Cohn, the lawyer who helped Sen. Joe McCarthy (R-WI) accuse people of treason without evidence, worked for DDT for 12 years. With Cohn as his mentor, DDT learned how to be a demagogue, to rule by threats and fear.

For almost a year, DDT didn’t mention Robert Mueller’s name, but a few months ago, he began his offensive comments against Mueller and his team, calling them all Democrats although Mueller is a conservative Republican. As he described Mueller “disgraced and discredited” and his team “thugs,” approval of the investigation dropped, but the latest Fox poll shows that DDT’s strategy no longer works. Approval of Mueller’s investigation is 59 percent from the conservative network, up from 48 percent in July—almost a 25 percent increase. Forty percent think that the investigation will find DDT’s criminal or impeachable offenses, up 5 points.

Leading Republicans have a solution for the Russian scandal, convictions, plea deals, indictments, etc.—shut down the investigation and get rid of AG Jeff Sessions. Senate Judiciary Chair Chuck Grassley (R-IA) suddenly found time for hearings if DDT appoints a new AG, and Sen. Lindsey Graham (R-SC) decided that Sessions might not be “qualified for the job [of AG]” after vigorously defending him for that position and ignored Sessions’ lying under oath in the hearings. One year ago, Graham told DDT that “there will be holy hell to pay” if he fires AG Jeff Sessions and dared DDT to “accept the consequences” if he made such a move. Now, after DDT’s most recent criticisms of Sessions, Graham recommends firing Sessions who has said that the DOJ “will not be improperly influenced by political considerations.” Maybe Graham’s turn-around comes from all the games of golf he plays with DDT.

October 25, 2017

DDT’s Obstruction of Justice

Filed under: Donald Trump — trp2011 @ 10:29 PM
Tags: , , ,

Can Dictator Donald Trump (DDT) be convicted of obstruction of justice? That’s the question that the Senate Judiciary Committee has been investigating, and there may never be an answer. The committee seems to have blown up, and each party will likely submit its own report. The Senate Intelligence Committee has said that it will no longer be investigating anything about DDT’s firing of former FBI director James Comey. Committee chair Richard Burr (R-NC) said, “Future questions surrounding Comey’s firing are better answered by the [special] counsel or by the Justice Department.”

Obstruction of justice is a charge for attempts to influence, obstruct or impede a federal investigation or a judicial process. Steven Harper has written about how DDT taken a number of actions that could be considered obstruction of justice.

Jan. 27, 2017: One week after the inauguration, acting Attorney General Sally Yates talked to White House counsel Don McGahn about her concerns regarding national security adviser Michael Flynn. During DDT’s campaign, Flynn was frequently in contact Russian Ambassador Sergey Kislyak. VP Mike Pence and press secretary Sean Spicer denied that Flynn talked about Russian sanctions in December, but Yates told McGahn that U.S. intelligence agencies knew these statements were false. If Flynn lied, Russians could blackmail him because they knew the truth. That was the same day that DDT called Comey to a private dinner at the White House and told him, “I need loyalty.”

Feb. 14, 2017: DDT asked Comey to stay for a private conversation after DDT’s advisers left. “I hope you can see your way clear to letting this go, to letting Flynn go,” DDT told Comey in private.

Mar. 20, 2017: Comey testified before Congress that the FBI was investigating DDT’s campaign connections to Russia.

March 22, 2017: DDT asks National Intelligence Daniel Coats and CIA Director Mike Pompeo to stay in the Oval Office after a briefing with senior officials. DDT complains to them about Comey’s handling of the Russia investigation and asks them to intervene with Comey to get the FBI to stop investigating Flynn. During later Senate testimony, Coates and Pompeo refuse to answer questions about this meeting without offering an explanation of any legal basis for doing so. A few days later, DDT asked Coats, Pompeo, and Director of National Security Mike Rogers to deny publicly “the existence of any evidence of coordination between his campaign and the Russian government.” Deputy Director of the NSA Richard Ledgett wrote an internal NSA memo documenting DDT conversation with Rogers, including DDT’s questioning the accuracy of the IC Assessment that Russia had interfered with the election. Senior White House officials also “sounded out top intelligence officials about the possibility of intervening directly with Comey to encourage the FBI to drop its probe of Michael Flynn.”

Mar. 30, 2017 and Apr. 11, 2017: DDT asked Comey to “lift the cloud” of the Russia investigation. DDT repeatly urged Comey to tell the public that DDT is not under investigation. Comey later testified to the Senate that the FBI and DOJ were reluctant to make a public statement that they did not have an open case on Trump “for a number of reasons, most importantly because it would create a duty to correct, should that change.”

Apr. 25, 2017:  DDT sent Flynn a message to “stay strong.”

May 2, 2017: DDT added witness intimidation to his series of “Russia hoax” tweets on the night before Comey’s scheduled testimony before the Senate Judiciary Committee: “FBI Director Comey was the best thing that ever happened to Hillary Clinton in that he gave her a free pass for many bad deeds! The phony…”

May 6-7, 2017: DDT had spent the past few days ranting about Comey’s Senate appearance on May 3. With the help of aide Stephen Miller, DDT drafted a four-page letter to Comey that outlined his reasons for firing Comey.

May 8, 2017: DDT continued his witness intimidation before Sally Yates testified about her January conversations with Don McGahn regarding Mike Flynn: “Ask Sally Yates, under oath, if she knows how classified information got into the newspapers soon after she explained it to W.H. Counsel.” DDT read the draft of his letter firing Comey to advisers, including White House counsel Don McGahn and VP Mike Pence. DDT’s son-in-law Jared Kushner, then-chief of staff Reince Priebus, Pence, and drafted talking points about Comey’s planned firing while DDT asked AG Jeff Sessions and Deputy Attorney General Rod Rosenstein for a memo outlining their problems with Comey. DDT used their statements as recommendations for his firing Comey.

May 9, 2017: DDT fired Comey while DDT’s subordinates, including, publicized the falsehood that Rosenstein had called for Comey’s termination.

May 10, 2017: DDT told Russian Foreign Minister Sergey V. Lavrov and Ambassador Kislyak in the Oval Office that he fired Comey because of “Russia.” DDT told them, “I just fired the head of the FBI. He was crazy, a real nut job … I faced great pressure because of Russia. That’s taken off … I’m not under investigation.”

May 11, 2017: DDT repeated the real reason, “Russia,” for firing Comey in an interview with Lester Holt on NBC.

May 12, 2017: The New York Times reported DDT’s “loyalty dinner” with Comey on January 27, and DDT sent another tweet to intimidate a witness: “James Comey better hope that there are no “tapes” of our conversations before he starts leaking to the press!”

May 18, 2017: DDT answered a question about whether he had ever asked Comey to close or back down on the investigation into Mike Flynn with the curt response: “No. No. Next question.”

May 18, 2017: Rosenstein testifies before a closed-door Senate briefing, reportedly saying that he knew DDT wanted to fire Comey before he wrote his letter justifying Comey’s removal. Rosenstein also said that DDT asked him to write the letter and that he knew on May 8 that DDT was planning to fire Comey.

June 6, 2017: The Washington Post reported that DDT was considering live-tweeting during James Comey’s upcoming Senate testimony.

June 7, 2017: DNI Coats and NSA Director Rogers both refused to testify about their personal interactions with DDT and whether DDT asked them to intervene in the Russia investigation at a Senate Intelligence Committee hearing.

June 8, 2017: Comey told the Senate Intelligence Committee that DDT had repeatedly asked him about Russia and that he understood DDT’s expressed “hope” about “letting Flynn go” as an order.

June 9, 2017: DDT called Comey a liar and accused him of leaking classified information.

July 8, 2017: DDT helped his son Donald Trump Jr. write a misleading statement about the son’s campaign meeting on June 9, 2016 with his top advisers and three Russians who promised to provide “dirt” on Hillary Clinton.

July 19, 2017: After incessant attacks on special investigator Robert Mueller, DDT talked about limitations to Mueller’s examination of the DDT-Russian connections.

July 21, 2017: The Washington Post reported that Trump had “asked his advisers about his power to pardon aides, family members and even himself in connection with the probe.” Such pardons might constitute obstruction of justice or an abuse of power.

July 26, 2017: About whether Mueller’s job was safe, DDT said, “No, we’re going to see.”

As Harper wrote:

“[DDT] lied about Comey’s firing, persisted in efforts to intimidate key witnesses, inserted himself into misleading statements about his campaign advisers’ meetings with Russians offering to help him win the election, and held the sword of Damocles over the special counsel investigating him? Behind any effort to obstruct justice is a fear of the truth.”

Barry H. Berke, Noah Bookbinder, and Norman Eisen have outlined the case against DDT in a detailed 108-page factual and legal analysis for the Brookings Institution. As Harper stated, “Trump’s actions have always been rational in a key respect: Trump does what is best for Trump, regardless of the consequences. If that means obstructing justice, so be it.”

Whenever DDT finds himself in trouble, he distracts. Richard Blumenthal (D-CT) claimed that DDT’s current distraction from Russia’s election meddling and potential obstruction of justice is DDT’s attention to the 2010 Uranium One deal. The member of the Senate Judiciary Committee said:

“The president has done everything he can — calling the investigation a hoax, bringing distracting issues to deflect attention from the potential obstruction of justice by his administration and possibly by himself into the investigation on Russian meddling, and Trump’s alleged collusion with that meddling.”

Sen. Chuck Grassley (R-IA), Judiciary chair, has called on the DOJ to appoint a special counsel to investigate the agreement giving a Russian-owned company partial control of U.S. atomic energy resources in 2010. Last week the committee said that it is opening an inquiry into the deal, and the House wants a joint investigation. The next GOP lie and the next shiny thing: Hillary Clinton benefited from the deal.

the way of improvement leads home

reflections at the intersection of American history, religion, politics, and academic life

© blogfactory

Genuine news

Civil Rights Advocacy

Never doubt that a small group of thoughtful, committed citizens can change the world. Indeed, it is the only thing that ever has. -- Margaret Mead

AGR Daily News

Transformational News; What Works For Seven Future Generations Without Causing Harm?

JONATHAN TURLEY

Res ipsa loquitur - The thing itself speaks

Jennifer Hofmann

Inspiration for soul-divers, seekers, and activists.

Occupy Democrats

Progressive political commentary/book reviews for youth and adults

V e t P o l i t i c s

politics from a liberal veteran's perspective

Margaret and Helen

Best Friends for Sixty Years and Counting...

Rainbow round table news

Official News Outlet for the Rainbow Round Table of the American Library Association

The Extinction Protocol

Geologic and Earthchange News events

Central Oregon Coast NOW

The Central Oregon Coast Chapter of the National Organization for Women (NOW)

Social Justice For All

Working towards global equity and equality

Over the Rainbow Books

A Book List from Gay, Lesbian, Bisexual, and Transgender Round Table of the American Library Association

The WordPress.com Blog

The latest news on WordPress.com and the WordPress community.

%d bloggers like this: