Nel's New Day

January 13, 2017

So How’s That Obamacare Repeal Going?

Why did people hate the Affordable Care Act, a law that helped people have better health care and live longer? Conservative leadership fed lies to their constituents—like this one from House Speaker Paul Ryan (R-WI) at a town-hall event this week–because they feared a Democratic plan would be popular. Ryan’s mistake was taking a question from a man who owns a small business in a red state, worked for the Reagan and Bush campaigns, and opposed the ACA. That was before the ACA saved his life after his life-threatening cancer was treated, thanks to “Obamacare.” Jeff Jeans said, “I want to thank President Obama from the bottom of my heart because I would be dead if it weren’t for him.”

Ryan’s response? The flat-out lie that the ACA is a “death spiral” because people won’t buy insurance when it gets too expensive.  If Ryan were right, enrollment numbers would be dropping. But instead they’re skyrocketing. The proportion of young adults is steady, proving that the mix of people enrolling this year is less likely to be sicker and more expensive. And this is happening despite the uncertainty about the future of health care for the people in the United States, thanks to the unhealthy obsession in the GOP Congress about a repeal.  Lies are failing with the public, however, because 75 percent object to repealing if there isn’t even a replacement.

Today, the U.S. House began their process of destroying health care for the millions and millions of people in the United States. A vote of 227-198 with only nine GOP defectors approved the budget resolution that the Senate passed in the dark of night earlier this week. The bill doesn’t specifically address the ACA, but the passed “budget reconciliation” is needed to kill off the ACA because of the danger from a Senate filibuster.

Rep. Charlie Dent (R-PA) warned that their action could send insurance markets into a collapse. Rep. Justin Amash (R-MI) tweeted, “Most massive budget in U.S. history passed 227-198. It adds more than $9 TRILLION to the debt over the next decade.” House Majority Whip Steve Scalise (R-LA) argued that the House had to pass the bill because they had campaigned on it.

The Senate vote allowed non-binding amendments showing the chamber’s position. These are positions that the GOP Senate oppose:

Protect people with pre-existing conditions: 52 million people in the U.S.—25 percent of non-elderly people—have pre-existing conditions. Before ACA, they were frequently denied any coverage. Only two Republicans voted in support of keeping these conditions in a health care plan.

Let young adults stay on their parents’ plan: Over six million young people 26 years old and younger have gained health insurance since this plan went into effect in 2010. Surveys show 85-percent approval of this provision. Again only two Republicans support this condition.

Maintain access to contraceptive coverage: The ACA has caused spending on contraceptive health care to drop 20 percent. Only two Republicans vote in favor of this amendment.

Ensure Medicaid expansion stays in place: 11 million low-income people benefited from this provision in 2015, and thousands of jobs were created for direct care workers.  Republicans unanimously defeated this amendment.

Protect children on Medicaid or CHIP: GOP Senators blocked this amendment.

Protect veterans’ health care: Republicans blocked an amendment to make it harder to restrict veterans’ access to VA health care.

Republicans demonstrated that they oppose insurance that requires pre-existing conditions, puts children up through age 26 on the parents’ policy, provides free contraceptive care, helps low-income people and children, and protects veterans. These are the leaders who want to take people’s health care: Vice President-elect Mike Pence with Senate Majority Leader Mitch McConnell and Sen. John Barrasso (AP Photo/Cliff Owen).

health-care-killers

The public opposition to ACA repeal began when more and more people understood that the congressional goal was to take away health care without any new plan. Sen Bob Corker warned that repeal without replacement would be “not very appealing.” Even ultra-conservative Sen. Ron Johnson (R-WI) asked for a replacement “game plan.” Passing the repeal/replacement also requires 60 votes in the Senate because of the filibuster.

The derailing of the grand repeal plan began just four days after the GOP Congress took over the country. That’s when Republicans determined that the GOP project to Make America Sick Again would cost more than four times than the extremely expensive Iraq War while it kills millions of private sector jobs. Republicans had a solution: hide the cost of their repeal. Page 25 of the new rules package passed by GOP House members stated that the Congressional Budget Office (CBO) should estimate the cost over $5 trillion—except Obamacare. Unfortunately, that plan didn’t work either: the word got out that what the GOP calls an “appropriate” level of public debt is actually an unnecessary anti-job debt spike.

Add to that problem Ryan’s decision to defund Planned Parenthood through a bill to repeal Obamacare, and the bill riled more conservatives. Two moderate female GOP senators opposed this suggestion, and the program is highly popular throughout the nation.

Some of the most conservative senators—Rand Paul (R-KY), Bob Corker (R-TN), and Tom Cotton (R-AR) for example—are reluctant to vote for the repeal because of the increasing deficit. Paul wants an immediate repeal but isn’t happy about the $10 trillion dollars added to the deficit. Even ultra-conservative Sen. Lamar Alexander (R-TN), chairman of the Health Committee, declared that it’s not smart to repeal without a replacement.  Sens. Susan Collins (R-ME) and John McCain (R-AZ) don’t like Repeal without Replace. Six dubious senators will put the 48 Democrats opposing the repeal to a majority of the chamber. Lisa Murkowski (R-AK) might join them because she, like Collins, doesn’t like the idea of defunding Planned Parenthood.

The repeal is rapidly coming to a head because GOP leadership wants to force the development of legislation by January 27. Wanting to postpone the deadline until March 3 are at least five GOP senators: Bill Cassidy (LA ), Susan Collins (ME), Bob Corker (TN), Lisa Murkowski (AK), and Rob Portman (OH).

Congressional Republicans are also facing opposition from GOP governors. John Kasich (OH) and Rick Snyder (MI) have already complained about the loss of Medicaid. Kasich said the hospitals need Medicaid that “has worked very well in this state.” He said that the program covers 700,000 of his residents; Snyder agreed when talking about his 642,000 people in Michigan. Other GOP governors opposing the repeal thus far are Charlie Baker (MA),  Asa Hutchinson (AR), and Brian Sandoval (NV).

Kasich eloquently expressed his concern:

“Let’s just say they just got rid of it, didn’t replace it with anything.” What happens to the 700,000 people [in Ohio]? What happens to drug treatment? What happens to mental health counseling? What happens to these people who have very high cholesterol and are victims from a heart attack? What happens to them?”

The GOP desire to balance the federal budget occurs only with Democratic presidents. Republican legislators showed no longing for “fiscal responsibility” during the Reagan/Bush years. Under Clinton, their need for zero deficit returned, but unfortunately for them, Clinton showed a surplus by the end of his two terms. In the two following Bush/Cheney terms, Republicans asserted that “deficits don’t matter.” They ran up trillions of costs for two wars, two tax-cut packages, Medicare expansion, and the Wall Street bailout.

During the two terms of Democratic President Obama, conservatives screamed about the ballooning deficit set in place by his predecessor. The GOP even lowered the credit rating of the United States and then closed down the country because of their demand for a balanced budget. With a prospective GOP president, the majority of GOP Congressional legislators started to repeal a law vastly increasing the deficit, a law that keeps people alive. Their plans would put the public debt to at least $29.1 trillion by 2016, according to the budget resolution they passed.

People are already losing jobs because of the GOP’s declaration that they will “repeal Obamacare.” The loss of health care for millions of people is already sending shock waves throughout the $3 trillion-a-year health system. Hospitals estimate that the repeal will cost them $165 billion within five years and trigger “an unprecedented public health crisis” if sick people can’t get care. The Advisory Board Company, providing services to health care firms, has already laid off 200 people partly because hospitals vastly decreased spending after the election.

With much lower health coverage, hospitals and health providers could find themselves on the hook for up to $1.1 trillion for uncompensated care in the next decade, causing the collapse of finances in hospitals serving needy populations. Their only solution would be to curtail services and reduce workforce, impacting health care access even for the insured. Illinois alone would suffer a loss of 95,000 jobs and $13.1 billion. Forty percent of the state’s hospitals are already in the red or close to it.

The question is whether the GOP can get over its gridlock and lack of bipartisanship to pass a “repeal and replace” law. I wouldn’t bet on it.

April 30, 2012

To Confused Conservatives: Why Women Aren’t Happy with You

What a view from conservatives regarding women’s rights! “Senate Democrats Plan another Trap for Mitt Romney with Female Voters,” reads the headline for Alexander Bolton’s “article” in the conservative publicationThe Hill.  What is the trap? Proposed legislation to more easily create equal pay for the genders. The Paycheck Fairness Act, blocked by Republicans two years ago, would prohibit employer discrimination in talking about other employers’ wages in both the same offices and other offices of the company. A woman could allege wage discrimination is she’s paid less than a man working for the same job for the same employer. That’s the “trap” causing Bolton to cry “foul”:  sending a bill up for a vote that mandates equal pay is trying to trap the poor Republicans.

These are the same conservatives who probably consider the Violence against Women Act (VAWA) to be a “trap” because it tries to protect all women, not just specific classes. Thirty-one male senators voted against VAWA; several of the others voted for it only because they think that the House will remove some of those “special classes” of women from protection. Calling the existing VAWA “controversial,” the men of the House were very sure to have women—specifically Sen. Kay Hutchinson (R-TX) and Rep. Sandy Adams (R-FL)—front and center to introduce the “uncontroversial” bill that eliminates certain classes of women. Or maybe they were just embarrassed to admit that some women deserve to be sexually assaulted.

After the House passed a bill taking Affordable Care Act funding to pay for keeping the federal student loan interest rate the same, Rep. John Boehner is trying to persuade anyone who will listen that this has nothing to do with women. The “slush fund,” as Boehner dismisses it, pays for hundreds of thousands of screenings for breast and cervical cancer. Mr. Boehner, those are women’s parts so the loss of funding hurts women.

In giving marching orders to House Republicans for the “reconciliation” of the budget, Reps. Boehner, Eric Cantor, and Jeb Hensarling sent a memo telling their colleagues to increase the defense budget while reducing food stamps. That’s another blow against women who are trying to find food for their children. The three House Republican leaders ignore the facts that the budget was settled last summer during the debt crisis and that they voted for this budget. Because Democratic senators arguing that the Budget Control Act counts as a budget with no need for an additional spending plan for 2013, the House Republicans are considering a seldom-used reconciliation process, hoping that Democrats won’t stick to last summer’s law and won’t have their own plan.

Republicans should use a mirror to see how offensive their behavior is. On a Meet the Press panel talking about the “war on women” yesterday, Republican strategist Alex Castellanos immediately interrupted Rachel Maddow when she said that women in this country make 77 cents for each dollar that men make and then continued to interrupt everything she said. She finally called him out on his “stylistic issue,” calling it “condescending,” after he said, ” I wish you are as right about what you’re saying as you are passionate about it. I really do.” The look on his face showed that he still didn’t get it. As Jason Easley wrote, “The goal was to put Rachel Maddow in her place, and to stop the ‘hysteria’ from the ‘girls’ who don’t understand that because men say so there is no war on women and pay gap.”

After Hilary Rosen mistakenly said that Mitt Romney’s wife, Ann, doesn’t work and then repeatedly apologized, saying that she meant Ann didn’t work outside the home, the Republicans thought they were home free. When Ann Romney went out on the campaign trail to make a speech, this is what she said: “I love the fact that there are women out there who don’t have a choice and they must go to work and they still have to raise the kids.” When she suggested that she understood poor families, she said that she and Mitt had to sell some of their stocks to get by in college. Her husband had already suggested that young people can start businesses the same way that he did, by borrowing $20,000 from his parents—back when $20,000 was equivalent to perhaps ten times what it is now.

Republicans around the country also ignore women’s needs. Florida Gov. Rick Scott is willing to drug-test welfare applicants before they can get any benefits although this costs the state. He also took $2 million from health care providers to give to the fake “crisis pregnancy centers” that keep women from having abortions no matter what their needs. His most recent attack on women is to veto $1.5 million for Florida’s rape crisis centers because he thinks it duplicates existing services. The majority of the existing services, however, are education and prevention; the $1.5 million would have gone to working with actual victims.

Ohio has a proposal to rearrange funding for women’s clinics, putting Planned Parenthood last. Local health departments get the top funding priority, followed by federally qualified community health centers, and then private care centers. The end result of the reprioritization leaves thousands of Ohio women with no birth control, cancer screenings, or STI testing and treatment. Although women could go to a private care center, not everyone who works at this private care center will provide birth control. “You would have to be an established patient, and it would depend on the doctor,” said the receptionist at Lower Lights Health Care center. Ohio plans to move funds meant to help cover contraception to groups that decide on a case by case basis whether or not they want to provide contraception.

Even candidates don’t take women seriously. Recently a woman asked State Attorney General Rob McKenna, Republican candidate for Washington governor, how he would vote on the Reproductive Parity Act, a bill that would expand insurance coverage for abortions in the state insurance plan as long as the plan covers maternity care as well. At first McKenna accused her of trying to “bushwhack” him by asking the question and asked her if she were being honest. When she tried to address the question, he snapped at her and said, “Why don’t you go get a job?” The woman runs “youth empowerment” programs at the YMCA.  Again a Republican man tried to shut up a woman by  being contemptuous to her.

In his speech at the White House Correspondents’ Association Dinner, President Obama described the Republican position: “Jimmy [Kimmel] got his start years ago on ‘The Man Show.’ In Washington, that’s what we call a congressional hearing on contraception.” No war on women? Thing.progress has produced a video collage of comments during the past few months. For another piece of black humor, check out this video from the Funny or Die website as women counsel Rick Santorum for aborting his campaign.

And these are just the most recent Republicans actions against women!

Civil Rights Advocacy

Never doubt that a small group of thoughtful, committed citizens can change the world. Indeed, it is the only thing that ever has. -- Margaret Mead

AGR Daily 60 Second News

Transformational News; What Works For Seven Future Generations Without Causing Harm?

JONATHAN TURLEY

Res ipsa loquitur - The thing itself speaks

Jennifer Hofmann

Inspiration for soul-divers, seekers, and activists.

Occupy Democrats

Progressive political commentary/book reviews for youth and adults

V e t P o l i t i c s

politics from a liberal veteran's perspective

Margaret and Helen

Best Friends for Sixty Years and Counting...

Rainbow round table news

Official News Outlet for the Rainbow Round Table of the American Library Association

The Extinction Protocol

Geologic and Earthchange News events

Central Oregon Coast NOW

The Central Oregon Coast Chapter of the National Organization for Women (NOW)

Social Justice For All

Working towards global equity and equality

Over the Rainbow Books

A Book List from Gay, Lesbian, Bisexual, and Transgender Round Table of the American Library Association

The WordPress.com Blog

The latest news on WordPress.com and the WordPress community.

%d bloggers like this: